Monday, 2 February 2015

The viva experience – how was it for you?

Taken from :

The viva experience – how was it for you?



The viva experience – how was it for you?

February 2, 2015 by Terry Tudor · No Comments · Teaching and Learning

One of the ‘rites of passage’ for postgraduate research students is the viva. The day when after all of your years of hard work, you finally get your few hours to be centre stage. For some its a joy, but for most perhaps a terrifying experience. From a personal experience, before hand it was certainly a mix of emotions including, uncertainity, trepidation and excitement. And the time went by the initial nerves calmed and things settled.
It is the one time of your life as a researcher, that you get to talk to someone else apart from your supervisor (assuming that you do actually see and talk to them),  who is (vaguely) interested in what you have done and has (hopefully) read your work. Therefore it should be an enjoyable few hours. Formats vary (for example, students sometimes do presentations at the start), but there will be questions. It should be a challenge, because you should be demonstrating what you’ve achieved. However, at the same time, it should also be a discussion.
In the UK, vivas are closed safe for the examiners and student (even though the supervisor can in some cases be present, if requested by the student). However, in other countries, including in Europe, they are public events, open to all to attend and ask questions. There are undoubtedly advantages and disadvantages in both approaches. While the open viva, can produce left field questions, it can perhaps lend more transparency to the process and also enable a wider cross section of the public to participate.
Ultimately, the most important thing is for the student to come away from the event challenged yes, but also having learnt something. Indeed, all parties should have been able to take something away. After all, the student (should) know more about the particular issue than anyone else in the room. In the end, hopefully they should have done enough not only to have passed (with minor corrections), but also to have impressed enough to have a potential mentor and friend upon whom they can call as they progress in their career.
To read more from this blog go to: http://mypad.northampton.ac.uk/terrytudor/

Author's Biographic details can be found at: http://mypad.northampton.ac.uk/terrytudor/sample-page/

All views are the authors, and may not reflect the views of any organisation the author is connected with in any way.

Thursday, 22 January 2015

Jisc at BETT 2015: enhancing the learning of students | Jisc

Jisc at BETT 2015: enhancing the learning of students | Jisc: "Jisc at BETT 2015: enhancing the learning of students"Jisc's Lawrie Phipps discusses the findings from a day of sessions on the topic of 'Enhancing the learning of students'. 

To hear the podcast go to http://www.jisc.ac.uk/podcasts/jisc-at-bett-2015-enhancing-the-learning-of-students-21-jan-2015

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All views are those of the author and should not be seen as the views of any organisation the author is associated with.

Tuesday, 20 January 2015

Why Your Students Forgot Everything On Your PowerPoint Slides | EdSurge News

Why Your Students Forgot Everything On Your PowerPoint Slides | EdSurge News



"Don’t fret, we’ve all been there: You’re up late the night before Thursday and you have to teach a lesson at 8 AM the next day. So, what do you do? Throw some text on a PowerPoint and get ready to talk through your points. Couldn’t hurt, right? You might not always read straight off of the slides--they’ll just help keep your lecture on track, and if you lose your place, the text is right there for you.

Unfortunately, whether you’re discussing Columbus with 4th graders or quantum physics with college freshmen, you may be hurting your students’ learning more than helping them.

Let’s explore what instructional design doesn’t typically work with students, or anyone’s learning for that matter, when you teach with PowerPoint--as well as how you can avoid it. It all begins with a little concept called “cognitive load.”"




To read more go to https://www.edsurge.com/n/2015-01-19-why-your-students-forgot-everything-on-your-powerpoint-slides 



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All views are those of the author and should not be seen as the views of any organisation the author is associated with.

Tuesday, 6 January 2015

Navigating the dynamic higher education landscape: A possible strategic framework | bethanyaldenrivers

Extract from: Navigating the dynamic higher education landscape: A possible strategic framework | bethanyaldenrivers:



"How can we provide quality assurance around the design and implementation of strategic programs for higher education? Increasingly, higher education institutions are implementing programs that address: distance and online learning, strategic partnerships, student success, as well as many other topics.

Here, I’ve attempted to develop a quality framework, based on my own principles for strategic program design and delivery, that rests on three overarching principles:

The strategic program is meaningful.
The strategic program is robust.
The strategic program is sustainable."



To read more go to: https://bethanyaldenrivers.wordpress.com/2015/01/05/strategic-framework/ 



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All views are the authors, and may not reflect the views of any organisation the author is connected with in any way.

Dazzled by pedagogical innovations | Alejandro Armellini

Extract from: Dazzled by pedagogical innovations | Alejandro Armellini:



"At recent events in the UK and overseas, I’ve had the opportunity to discuss the concept of pedagogical innovation in higher education. In particular, I focused on whether certain initiatives (often carrying flashy names) constitute pedagogical innovation and if so, against what criteria.

The key message of this blog post is this: many of such initiatives are not pedagogically innovative. They can be described in many other ways, including technologically innovative and sometimes disruptive. However, most fail to meet a basic criterion for innovative pedagogy: evidence that they improve (or have the potential to improve) student learning:

“Adapting to characteristics of students and responding to their development is an inherent aspect of pedagogy. […] These adaptations can be considered innovations if are based [sic] on a new idea and when they have the potential to improve student learning, or when they are linked with other outcomes […]”

(Vieluf, Kaplan, Klieeme & Bayer, 2012. Emphasis added)."



To read more go to: https://alejandroarmellini.wordpress.com/2014/12/28/dazzled-by-pedagogical-innovations/





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Friday, 12 December 2014

Book Review:International Students in the Asia Pacific – Mobility, Risks and Optimism (Peter Kell & Gillian Vogl, 2012)

International Students in the Asia Pacific – Mobility, Risks and Optimism (Peter Kell & Gillian Vogl, 2012)

Rashmi Dravid

Abstract


The book offers a comprehensive understanding of complex dynamics of factors that characterize international student mobility while unpacking the inherent contradictions.

Keywords


Internationalisation; student mobility; student experience

Full Text:

PDF

References


Beck, U. (2006) ‘Living in the World Risk Society.’ Economy and Society, 35 (3): 329-345. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03085140600844902
Kell, P. M. and Vogl, G. J. (2007) Internationalisation, national development and markets: Key dilemmas for leadership in higher education in Australia. In Kell, P. and Vogl, G. (eds) Between The Flags! From Local Dangers to Global Risks for International Students. International Students in the Asia Pacific. Springer.
Kell, P. and Vogl, G. (2012) International students in the Asia Pacific. Springer.
UNESCO/Council of Europe (2001) Code of Good Practice in the provision of Transnational Education. Available at http://www.coe.int/t/dg4/highereducation/recognition/code%20of%20good%20practice_EN.asp (accessed 6/12/14)
Vogl, G. and Kell, P. (2010) Welcome to Wollongong: host communities and international students. Macquarie University Research Online.


DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14234/elehe.v6i1.91


All views are the authors, and may not reflect the views of any organisation the author is connected with in any way.

Understanding student engagement with social entrepreneurship: a case study of the University of Northampton

Understanding student engagement with social entrepreneurship: a case study of the University of Northampton

Terry Louis Tudor, Cleber Dutra

Abstract


The development of skills for social enterprise is a key learning outcome in UK higher education. Using semi-structured interviews and questionnaires with students at the University of Northampton, this study aimed to examine the key factors that impacted upon student engagement with social entrepreneurship. The study showed that while levels of engagement were generally low, there were significant opportunities to improve these levels. A range of psycho-sociological factors (e.g. behavioural intentions, fears of debt, and awareness), as well as socio-demographic factors (e.g. gender), were found to have impacted upon student engagement with the concepts. Recommendations for increasing engagement including improving awareness, being mindful of terminology used, access to funding, and the need for greater cross-faculty working are suggested. While this is only a limited case study, the implications of the findings for wider UK HEIs such as provision of adequate funding and support, and the need to address key concerns such as student perceptions of links between grants and loans to debt, and limited awareness of social entrepreneurship, are also discussed.

Keywords


Social entrepreneurship; University of Northampton; HEIs; social innovation; social enterprise

Full Text:

PDF

References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14234/elehe.v6i1.87


The Journal Enhancing the Learner Experience in Higher Education can be found at: http://journals.northampton.ac.uk/index.php/elehe/index



All views are the authors, and may not reflect the views of any organisation the author is connected with in any way.